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Flu Shots Chula Vista CA

This page provides useful content and local businesses that can help with your search for Flu Shots. You will find helpful, informative articles about Flu Shots, including "’Tis the Season". You will also find local businesses that provide the products or services that you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in Chula Vista, CA that will answer all of your questions about Flu Shots.

American Chiropractic Services
(619) 616-7726
535 H St
Chula Vista, CA

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Pacific Pet Hospital
(619) 585-7387
1466 Melrose Ave
Chula Vista, CA

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Otay Lakes Veterinary Clinic/Rolling Hills Pe
(619) 482-2000
2457 Fenton Street
Chula Vista, CA

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Eye Studio Optometry, Inc.
(619) 377-6065
4475 University Ave
San Diego, CA

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Tom Pousti
(619) 466-8851
8851 Center Dr
San Diego, CA
Business
Pousti Plastic Surgery Center - Tom Pousti
Specialties
Cosmetic Surgery

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Rolling Hills Pet Hospital
(619) 656-6400
2457 Fenton Street
Chula Vista, CA

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South Bay Vet Hospital
(619) 422-6186
1038 Broadway
Chula Vista, CA

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Bay Cities Chiropractic
(619) 512-5305
1727 Sweetwater Rd. Suite# S
National City, CA

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R Bradley Sanders, DO
(619) 589-0552
7200 Parkway Dr
La Mesa, CA
Business
Psychiatric Health Systems
Specialties
Psychiatry & Psychology

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Caruthers Chiropractic
(619) 324-7039
5360 Jackson Drive Ste.116
La Mesa, CA

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’Tis the Season

October 21, 2010

’Tis the Season

by Kenny Miles

If you’re still unsure about getting a flu shot, listen to these athletes’ stories.

Even though influenza lands more than 200,000 Americans in hospitals for flu-related complications each year, many people don’t opt for a flu shot. That’s the case for many African Americans. They are the least likely of any U.S. population group to get the seasonal flu vaccine, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

This is why retired NBA player Jamal Mashburn (formerly of the Miami Heat) and former Philadelphia Eagle Mike Quick recently joined Olympic gold medalist Vonetta Flowers as spokespersons for the American Lung Association’s “Faces of Influenza” campaign.

“Once when I played with the Dallas Mavericks, I was hospitalized with the flu,” Mashburn says. “It was a terrible thing to deal with. I was in the hospital for three to four days trying to get my body back. It was a tough deal because you never know how your body is going to respond to the [flu]. I was very weak.”

Mashburn vowed not to put himself in that situation again.

One of the reasons Mashburn made that vow is because influenza is a communicable disease that causes a host of unpleasant symptoms, such as chills, fever, sore throat, muscle pains, severe headache, coughing, weakness and fatigue.

The flu is a serious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses that can have severe complications, including death, says Michael Shafe, MD, medical director for the Urgency Room in Kansas City, Missouri. “The unique flu season last year is a strong reminder of the seriousness of the disease and the devastating effects it can have even for healthy people,” Shafe says. “I have seen infants, elderly and even previously healthy patients who were infected by a family member who refused an immunization because they did not like shots.”

Former Philadelphia Eagles wide receiver Mike Quick was a man who avoided injections and medicine unless he absolutely needed them. But at 32, after a severe bout of the flu landed Quick in the hospital for several days, he changed his mind about getting flu vaccinations.

“We are slow to move on health issues, especially a lot of African-American men,” Quick says. “We are not as fast to take care of our health. We take care of a lot of other things before we put ourselves first.”

One way to block potential flu infections is simple: Get vaccinated.
Two types of flu vaccines are available. One is a flu shot that contains deactivated virus and is approved for healthy people older than six months and for those with chronic medical conditions. The other is a nasal-spray version of the flu vaccine but made with active yet weakened influenza viruses that don’t cause the flu. This spray version is approved for use in healthy people ages 2 to 49, including women ...

Click here to read the rest of this article from Real Health Magazine


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