A Smart + Strong Site
Subscribe to:
Real Health magazine
E-newsletters

Child Obesity Specialists Memphis TN

Local resource for child obesity specialists in Memphis. Includes detailed information on local businesses that provide access to advice on obesity in adolescence, heart attacks, meal plans for kids, children's exercise habits, childhood obesity epidemics, food addiction in kids, and obesity prevention programs, as well as advice and content on combating childhood obesity.

Portera Gregory MD
(901) 257-4005
3101 Walnut Grove Road
Memphis, TN
 
Beth Ellen Haberman, MD
(513) 636-5465
355 S Prescott St
Memphis, TN
Specialties
Pediatrics, Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Louisville Sch Of Med, Louisville Ky 40202
Graduation Year: 1993

Data Provided By:
Dr. Catherine Ann Chidester
(901) 461-7270
301 High Point Ter
Memphis, TN
Specialty
Pediatrics

Marie Lyons Joiner, MD
(901) 324-4587
284 W Central Park St Apt 2
Memphis, TN
Specialties
Pediatrics
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 2004

Data Provided By:
Center for Urinary & Pelvic Disorders
(901) 257-4005
3101 Walnut Grove Road
Memphis, TN
 
Catherine Ann Chidester, MD
(901) 461-7270
301 High Point Ter
Memphis, TN
Specialties
Pediatrics
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 2004

Data Provided By:
Carolyn Whitney, MD
(901) 375-1700
1961 S Parkway E
Memphis, TN
Specialties
Pediatrics
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Meharry Med Coll Sch Of Med, Nashville Tn 37208
Graduation Year: 1984

Data Provided By:
Marilyn P Watts, MD
(901) 774-1988
3330 Dell Glade Dr
Memphis, TN
Specialties
Pediatrics
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Tx Med Branch Galveston, Galveston Tx 77550
Graduation Year: 1995

Data Provided By:
Beth Anne Kurt, MD
(901) 473-9523
18 N Reese St
Memphis, TN
Specialties
Pediatrics, Internal Medicine-Pediatrics
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Mi State Univ Coll Of Human Med, East Lansing Mi 48824
Graduation Year: 2001

Data Provided By:
Hill John R MD
(901) 320-3065
3445 Poplar Avenue Suite 13
Memphis, TN
 
Data Provided By:

Is Childhood Obesity Also Child Abuse?

November 30, 2009

Is Childhood Obesity Also Child Abuse?

What should the state do if a child’s weight becomes life threatening? Recently, South Carolina authorities dealt with just such a situation by arresting the mother of a 14-year-old boy who weighed 555 pounds, reported USA Today .

The mother, Jerri Gray, had fled the state with her son, Alexander Draper, after a hearing was scheduled to determine whether she was “medically negligent” in caring for her child. She was arrested in Baltimore, and her son was placed in protective custody once police returned the two to South Carolina.

With childhood obesity rates soaring, the case garnered national attention. Gray’s attorney, Grant Varner, said that if his client is found guilty of “criminal neglect,” it will set a precedent “that opens a Pandora’s box” in the area of child abuse.

Last year, a report by the Child Welfare League of America (CWLA), a nationwide group devoted to the well-being of vulnerable American children, indicated that state courts in Texas, Pennsylvania, New York, New Mexico, Indiana and California fought to address the issue.

As a result, all of those state courts (except the one in California) expanded their legal definition of “medical neglect” to now include morbid obesity. They ruled that the children involved in these cases were victims of neglect.

And although the parents involved in these cases were not sentenced to jail time, the courts in California and Indiana did file criminal charges against them.

Linda Spears, vice president of policy and public affairs for the CWLA, said that she thinks criminal charges should be a last resort.

“I think I would draw the line at a place where there are serious health consequences for the child and efforts to work with the family have repeatedly failed,” Spears told USA Today.

Gray’s attorney said his client followed the nutritional guideli...

Click here to read the rest of this article from Real Health Magazine

More Sleep, Less Obesity Risk in Kids

November 5, 2007

More Sleep, Less Obesity Risk in Kids

A lack of sleep may raise children’s risk of obesity, according to a new study. Researchers at the University of Chicago found that every additional hour per night that a third-grader spends sleeping results in a 40 percent reduction in the chance that the child will be obese in the sixth grade. The study, which appeared in the November issue of the journal Pediatrics, found that sleeping more than nine hours and 45 minutes significantly lowered the obesity risk in third-graders. The authors say that their results give parents more reasons to be strict about bedtimes, limit their children’s caffeine intake and remove televisions from their kids’ bedrooms.

...

Click here to read the rest of this article from Real Health Magazine

The Danger of Childhood Obesity

January 11, 2007

The Danger of Childhood Obesity

Nothing looks cuter than a baby chubby with baby fat. Yet, that same baby fat should be cause for concern when it remains on a toddler. Childhood obesity is a growing problem in this society, and its beginning occurs earlier in life than many realize. According to a study published December 28 in the online edition of the American Journal of Public Health, more than a third of low-income, urban children are overweight before three years old. Across the board, approximately 30 percent of American children are overweight as reported by the American Obesity Association.

Not everyone who is overweight is obese. Many children and adults are a few pounds above their ideal weight, but obesity refers to a body mass index (a statistical measure of weight and height) of 30 or higher. Even if a child is only slightly overweight, parents should not wait it out and assume the child will grow slimmer. A September 2006 press release from the National Institutes of Health shows a strong link between being overweight in early childhood and obesity in adolescence.

Children who are overweight in elementary school are 25 times more likely to be overweight at age 12 compared to their peers who were normal weight at the same age. Unless serious changes occur, these children risk becoming adults who face heart attacks, strokes and other health problems, as well as limited enjoyment out of life.

Obesity often correlates to a la...

Click here to read the rest of this article from Real Health Magazine


[ about Smart + Strong | about Real Health | advertising | contact us | advertising policy ]
© 2011 Smart + Strong. All Rights Reserved. Terms of use and Your privacy
Smart + Strong® is a registered trademark of CDM Publishing, LLC.